Comptrain Class
Programming

Thursday 7.19.18

“Deadpool”

On the 3:00 x 7 Rounds (21 Minutes):
21 AbMat Sit-Ups
14 Medicine Ball Squat Jumps (30/20)
7-6-5-4-3-2-1 Deadlifts

Athletes will begin each of the 7 rounds on a 3-minute intervals. Rounds begin on the 0:00, 3:00, 6:00, 9:00, 12:00, 15:00, and 18:00. Scores today are deadlift weights used. Athletes have the option to climb in weight across the rounds or stay at a challenging weight throughout. Round 1 is 7 deadlifts, round 2 is 6 deadlifts and so on. These should all be loads that are challenging, but unbroken. If unequipped with 30# medicine balls, complete 21 repetitions with a (20/14) medicine ball.

:30 Seconds

Medicine Ball Foot Taps
Push-up to Down Dog

Medicine Ball Deadlifts
Active Spidermans

Squat to Medicine Ball
Active Samson

Barbell Warmup

5 Good Mornings
5 Back Squats
5 Elbow Rotations
5 Strict Presses
5 Stiff-Legged Deadlifts
5 Front Squats

Squat Hold – 1 Minute

Using the medicine ball to assist the athletes to the bottom of the squat, the goal here is to drive the knees out with the elbows while keeping the heels on the ground.

Medicine Ball Ankle Stretch – :30 Seconds Each Side

Stepping out into a lunge, place the medicine ball on top of front knee. Keeping the heel on the ground, drive knee forward over the toe.

Medicine Ball Squat Jumps

Ball Position

In the medicine ball squat jump, athletes will descend below parallel before getting a slight jump off the ground, just far enough that there is a space between the feet and the floor. Looking for the medicine ball to stay as close to the middle of the body as possible. Hugging the ball with both arms nice and close to the chest will best accomplish this. The other option would be to hold it like a wall ball, but that would be pretty taxing on the midline, especially with the increased weight. There will be a slight natural lean forward of the torso, but it should not be excessive to the point where the weight is in the toes and athletes are rounding their backs.

Hips – Knees

With a more dynamic squatting movement, it is even more important that the lower body sequence stays in order. It is common to see the knees track forward first, only sending the hips back when it become difficult to get any lower. Beginning the movement prep with the slower, basic air squat to hammer home hips back first, then knees out.

Movement Prep

Establish Ball Position
5 Air Squats
5 Air Squat Jumps

5 Medicine Ball Squats
5 Medicine Ball Squat Jumps

AbMat Sit-ups

Positioning

The reason we use the AbMat for sit-ups is because the shape allows for full extension and full flexion of the abdominals, something that is not possible in the crunch or regular sit-up. The correct position of the AbMat is to have the thicker side facing the athlete with a small gap between the lower back and the AbMat. If we are looking to get the most out of the abs, placing the heels on the ground with the knees spread wide reduces the use of the hip flexors. This is more of a true AbMat sit-up than placing the feet straight out front, although either way is acceptable for today’s workout.

Movement Prep

5 Sit-ups

Deadlifts

Feet – Hands – Shins – Chest

Focusing on the order of the setup of the deadlift today, as it sets the tone for the lift. When athletes approach the bar they can first think of where their feet are. The loops of the laces should be directly under the bar. The hands will then grab the bar just outside the knees. Now, athletes will bring their shins to the bar and pull their chest up to set their back into a natural position. Repeating this on every first deadlift, which tends to be the most difficult, will better ensure a safe and strong pulling position. Feet, hands, shins, chest.

Leg Press

Once athletes are locked into their setup position, they want to try and maintain the neutral back angle that they just worked to establish. If the hips rise first without the bar, athletes will find themselves in a very rounded back position. Squeezing the abs, locking the arms to the side, and pressing through the floor will better allow for a good position. When we think about a leg press machine at a traditional gym, the back is locked in and only the legs are doing the work. We can approach this like one of those machines. Lock the upper body and back in and just let the legs do the work.

Movement Prep

5 Empty Bar Deadlifts

Grab Light Weight:
Setup Routine
3 Deadlifts

Grab Slightly Heavier Weight:
Setup Routine
3 Deadlifts

1 Round

9 AbMat Sit-ups
7 Medicine Ball Squat Jumps
5 Deadlifts

Build to heavier deadlift weight

1 Round

7 AbMat Sit-ups
5 Medicine Ball Squat Jumps
3 Deadlifts

Looking for each round today to be a sprint, taking somewhere between 1:15 – 1:45 depending on the number of deadlifts and the weight on the bar. The remaining time in the 3-minute intervals will be spent recovering, recording scores, and changing out weights on the barbell. The AbMat Sit-ups are essentially the buy-in to the round, with athletes pushing to complete the squat jumps and deadlifts unbroken. Quick transitions from movement to movement, along with a good setup position in the deadlift will make each round a great round.

Wednesday 7.18.18

“Fortitude”

Alternating On the Minute x 30 (15 Rounds):
Even Minutes – 15/12 Calorie Row
Odd Minutes – 15 Burpees

“Fortitude” is a classic CrossFit New England benchmark workout. Athletes will alternate back and forth between calories on the rower and burpees. They will have the whole first minute to complete a 15/12 Calorie Row, resting until the top of the next minute. They will then have the whole next minute to complete 15 burpees. These numbers are meant to be challenging, but ideally something that athletes can complete between 45-50 seconds each round. Some modification options would be to bring the rep numbers down to somewhere between 10-15, to make each minute :45 seconds on and :15 seconds off, or to bring down the total number of rounds. It is better to pick a modification from the beginning and stick to it than it is to modify in the middle of the workout. If short on rowers, start athletes on opposite stations. If there are not enough rowers, complete one of the following:

12/10 Calorie Assault Bike
15/12 Calorie Schwinn Bike
15/12 10-Meter Shuttle Runs

:30 Seconds

Easy Row
Push-up to Down Dog

Medium Row
Active Spidermans

Faster Row
Active Samson + Air Squats

Row

Recovery

The recovery on the row is aptly named, as it is athletes opportunity to essentially relax. Rather than actively pulling the body back to the catch with the feet, athletes can let gravity do most of the work here. The only thing to really focus on is making sure the arms straighten past the knees before the knees bend. The less athletes do on the recovery, the more energy they will have to put towards the actual stroke.

Quality, Not Quantity

While there is a sense of urgency to get the calories done within the minute, focusing on quality of strokes and not quality can accomplish a similar amount of work with significantly less effort. Rather than being in panic mode, athletes will find themselves in full control if they are conscious about their stroke quality and not the number of strokes they take. The higher the stroke rate, the more energy it takes to maintain. Rowing somewhere between 24-28 stroke per minute will likely be ideal for athletes today in this longer, steady state workout.

Movement Prep

:20 Seconds Row @ 24 Strokes Per Minute
:20 Seconds Row @ 26 Strokes Per Minute
:20 Seconds Row @ 28 Strokes Per Minute

Burpees

Recovery

Burpees have a place for recovery as well. It’s falling back towards the ground. Gravity can get most of the work done here as well, with athletes using the hands and the feet to break their fall. Again, the less is done in the recovery phase, the more energy can be put towards the work phase.

Tempo

Just like stroke rate, different paces are appropriate for different types of workouts. We can create a “Burpee Per Minute” pace. If athletes find themselves at 15 BPM, each burpee will take them 4 seconds, getting the work done in exactly a minute. If they are at a 20 BPM pace, each burpee will take them 3 seconds, getting the 15 reps done in 45 seconds. Finding a pace somewhere between 3-4 seconds per burpee will likely be sustainable across all rounds, and is easier to hold than most people may think. In movement prep we can feel out these different gears, with multiple opportunities to test out paces. Start at the top of a minute or on the :30 on a clock and have athletes complete 5 burpees, noting how long it took them at completion. This will give them a good idea of what their ideal pace will be for the workout.

Movement Prep

5 Burpees (Slow and Controlled)
5 Burpees (Slightly Faster, But Still Controlled)

1 Round

1st Minute: :45 Second Row
2nd Minute: :45 Second Burpees

Finding a steady pace to stick to for the majority of this workout is the name of the game. The difficulty will undoubtedly increase in the later rounds, but being able to stay calm and keep the heart rate down in the earlier rounds will better guarantee success in the second half of this thirty minute effort. Quick transitions to and from the rower gain back precious seconds and allow athletes to work for the full minute each round. Fast is smooth, smooth is fast.

Tuesday 7.17.18

“Liquid Cocaine”

5 Rounds:
5 Power Clean and Jerks (155/105)
10 Chest to Bar Pull-ups

In this old-school CrossFit New England workout, athletes should choose a weight on the barbell that they could complete unbroken when fresh, but one that will likely be completed in quick singles or very small sets during the workout. Athletes can also look to choose a pull-up variation they could complete unbroken when fresh, but one that break into 2 sets per round within the workout.

Line Drills

Quad Stretch
Knee to Chest
Straight Leg Kicks
Side Lunge
Cradle Stretch
Walking Samson
Walking Spidermans
Inchworms
3 Air Squats + 1 Broad Jump
Skip for Distance
Skip for Height

Barbell Warmup

5 Good Mornings
5 Back Squats
5 Elbow Rotations
5 Strict Presses
5 Stiff-Legged Deadlifts
5 Front Squats

Front Rack Stretch – 1 Minute

Laying on your chest, place our elbows out in front, arms bent at 90 degrees. The goal is to close the gap between the armpits and the floor, which will stretch the lats, shoulders, and triceps.

PVC Pass Throughs – :45 Seconds


With hands wide and arms long, raise arms up and over the head until PVC touches behind you.

Wrist Stretch – :45 Seconds

From hands and knees position, place palms on the ground with fingertips facing towards you. With elbows locked, actively rock back and forth through range of motion to feel the stretch in the wrist.

Chest to Bar Pull-ups

Grip

A week ago we had pull-ups in the benchmark workout “Helen”. We talked about the importance of getting the knuckles over the bar with a full grip. Having to move the bodyweight a further distance today, this full grip is even more important. In a similar way to how the false grip gives you better leverage on the rings, a full grip with knuckles over gives athletes better leverage and puts the shoulder into a stronger, externally rotate position. Rather than just thinking about getting the knuckles over the bar with a full grip, athletes can focus on getting the pinky knuckle over the bar. This puts them in a very stable position to kip and pull from. To reinforce this idea, you can have athlete feel the difference in how stable their shoulder feels from a fingertip hanging position and pinky knuckles over position.

Kick and Press

The chest to bar pull-up requires a lower point of contact than just getting the chin over the bar. This, in turn, requires a little more of a backswing or horizontal body position. Athletes can find this position by aggressively kicking with straight legs while simultaneously pressing down on the bar. This situates and elevates the body enough the successfully make contact below the collarbone when they pull the chest towards the bar.

Movement Prep

Establish Grip
10 Second Fingertip Hang
10 Second Pinky Knuckle Over Hang

10 Scap Pull-ups
5 Kip Swings
1-3 Strict Pull-ups or Ring Rows
3 Pull-ups
3 Chest to Bar Pull-ups

Movement Substitutions

Reduce Reps
Pull-ups
Jumping Chest to Bar Pull-ups
Banded Chest to Bar Pull-ups
Ring Rows

Clean

Grip

Touching on grip again, this time in the clean. The first priority is the hook grip, as this allows for the most secure grip and a powerful extension of the hips. Secondly, similar to the pull-up bar, we want the knuckles around the barbell, this time underneath instead of on top. Doing a wrist curl with the barbell will point the elbows out and lock them out, allowing athletes to keep the bar close to the body and prevent and early arm bend.

Movement Prep

Establish Grip
3 Hang High Pulls
3 Hang Muscle Cleans

1 High Hang Power Clean
2 Hang Power Cleans
3 Power Cleans

Jerks

Grip

When receiving a clean, athletes will sometimes catch the bar in their fingertips. While great for just cleaning, this is not a great position to go overhead from. When going overhead, we are looking for a full, yet not too tight grip on the barbell. The thumb will still be in front of the bar for support (no hook grip), with the heel of the hand pointed towards the ceiling and other four fingers wrapped around the backside. This is also an ideal position overhead. It essentially mimics a J-hook that you would see on a squat rack. Your four fingers are the back post, the palm is the bottom support, and the thumb is the hook in front that prevents the bar from dumping forward. Athletes can practice this grip at the start and finish of the jerk, and then work to catch the clean in this position, making for an easier and more stable transition overhead.

Chin

A head serves as a roadblock to keeping the bar moving upward in a straight line. On the strict presses and push presses in today’s movement prep, athletes can practice tucking the chin back. This will better allow them to keep the bar balanced over the mid-foot in the jerk portion of the clean and jerk.

Movement Prep

Establish Hand Position
3 Strict Press
3 Push Press

3 Push Jerks

3 Clean and Jerks

Build to lighter weight

1 Round

3 Clean and Jerks
6 Chest to Bar Pull-ups

Build to Workout Weight

1 Round

3 Clean and Jerks
6 Chest to Bar Pull-ups

Looking at the overall volume today, we have 25 moderate weight clean and jerks and 50 chest to bar pull-ups. Taking into consideration how we would likely break those up as a whole will help athletes make a decision on what is best for them each round. Right off the bat, we can confidently say that singles will likely be the best option on the clean and jerks. The pull-ups will be athlete dependent, but we are probably looking at 1-3 sets here. 5-5 or 4-3-3 are options for 2 and 3 set strategies. Whatever the chosen option, the goal is to minimize time spent not moving.

Monday 7.16.18

Back Squat

5 Sets of 3

Front Rack Reverse Lunge

3 Sets of 12

“Sore Subject”

Alternating Tabata x 8 Minutes:
Back Squat (45/35)
Double Unders

Athletes will work through two different barbell movements before completing a simple, yet effective Tabata cash-out. On the back squat and the front rack lunges, athletes have the option to either build to something heavy across their sets or stay at a challenging weight throughout. For the front rack reverse lunges, athletes will complete six repetitions per leg, taking the bar out of a rack. During the metcon, the empty barbells will come from the floor. With short time domains, the weight and rope variation should be something that athletes are confident they can move for the majority of each twenty second interval without stopping. The format goes as follows:

8 Rounds:
:20 Seconds Back Squats
:10 Seconds Rest
:20 Seconds Double Unders
:10 Seconds Rest

:30 Seconds

Jumping Jacks
Push-up to Down Dog

Easy Single Unders
Active Spidermans

Higher Single Unders
Active Samson + Air Squat

Modified Barbell Warmup


5 Stiff-Legged Deadlifts
5 Front Squats

5 Reverse Lunges (Each Leg)
5 Strict Press
5 Elbow Rotations
5 Back Squats

Banded Walks

A couple of options here. If your gym is equipped with mini bands, have athletes place the band just below the knee. You may also double or triple loop a low tension band. Other option is to have athletes step on a medium tension band, with the inside edges of the band coming in contact with the outside edge of the foot. From here, looking to assume a quarter squat stance with the hips back and the knees driving out. Maintaining this position throughout, have athletes take 10 steps in each direction, followed by 10 squats. Repeating this for another 10 steps in each direction and 10 squats.

Double Unders

Paint Brushes

It is common to see athletes who have some double unders, but not large sets, do a really good job of spinning the rope with their ropes. However, what direction athletes direct the hands is almost more important than the spin itself. What often happens is the flick of the wrist happens as the hands and the shoulders move back, bringing the rope closer to the middle of the foot. This increases the likelihood of tripping up quite a bit. Athletes can pretend that they have two wet paint brushes in their hands. Keeping the shoulders and hands forward and unmoving, they want to direct the water forward. If the hands and shoulders stay in one spot as they spin the rope, the lower body can better coordinate with where the rope is.

Movement Prep

:15 Seconds Single Under Wrists Rotations*
:15 Seconds Quick Single Unders
:15 Seconds Double Under Wrist Rotations*
:15 Seconds Double Unders Practice

*Rope in front of body. Just moving hands and handle, not rope.

Movement Substitutions

Single Unders

Back Squat & Front Rack Reverse Lunges

Midline

Looking to create a rock solid foundation for both of these movement by dialing in the midline and feet. Having a strong and stable base is important when trying to move heavier weights. Rather than wearing a belt, athletes can look to create their own belt by learning how to properly stabilize their core. Where your ribs stop, your spine is only supported by the musculature around it. Athletes can complete what is called the “valsalva maneuver” to help increase the pressure within the abdominals, helping the musculature support the spine and discs. Before athletes squat down or step back, they will take a big breath in through the belly (not chest) and lock it down. The benefit comes through holding this breath through the most difficult portion of the lifts. When athletes feel like they have gotten through the “sticking point” of the lift, that is where they breathe out and repeat for the next lift. This maneuver is not recommend for athletes who are pregnant, elderly, or who have high blood pressure.

Feet

The feet are the base of the pyramid. The stronger we are here, the better balance and mechanics athletes will showcase. In the back squat and the lunge, especially the front rack, the weight always wants to shift athletes forward onto their toes and towards the inside of the foot. Athletes have the really fight to keep the whole foot in contact with the ground, keeping the big toes, pinky toes, and heels in contact with the ground throughout. When trying to balance on a single leg, athletes can really feel their feet, as they are fighting to maintain balance.

Back Squat Movement Prep

5 Pausing Air Squats
5 Valsalva Air Squats
5 Valsalva Back Squats

Front Rack Reverse Lunge Movement Prep 

:20 Seconds Single Leg Balance (Right Leg)
:20 Seconds Single Leg Balance (Left Leg)
5 Bodyweight Reverse Lunges (Each Leg)
3 Valsalva Front Rack Reverse Lunges (Each Leg)

Athletes will have a little over 20 minutes to complete their 5 sets of back squats and 3 sets of front rack reverse lunges. There is no set time for either, but we want to make sure that they have a sufficient amount of time for each. With 8 sets total, this means that athletes are completing a set roughly every 3 minutes. During the back squat, we recommend that athletes practice failing at a light weight. Rather than having a spotter behind athletes, show them how to throw the bar back and broad jump forward with a warmup weight so that they know what to do later if the situation arises where they can’t stand the weight up.

1 Round

:20 Seconds Back Squats
:10 Seconds Rest
:20 Seconds Double Unders

Score today is the lowest number of repetitions across the 8 rounds of each movement. For example, if athletes get 12 back squats for the first 7 rounds, but 14 for the last round, their score for the back squats is 12. Same goes for the double unders. With a short time window and short rest periods, athletes want to ensure that the transitions from movement to movement are fast. Setting the rope down neatly will better ensure that there are no wasted seconds between. When the rope goes down, just getting the bar on the back to be ready for the start of the back squats will likely allow athletes to squeeze in a few more reps per round.

Sunday 7.15.18

“Crunch Time”

4 Rounds For Time:
30 Russian Kettlebell Swings (70/53)
30 AbMat Sit-ups
30/21 Calorie Row

The big movement in this triplet is the Russian Kettlebell Swings. With the reduced range of motion, looking for athletes to push a little outside their normal comfort zone, picking a heavier weight, but one that they could still swing for 20+ repetitions unbroken when fresh.

1 Minute

Easy Row
Active Spidermans

:45 Seconds

Medium Row
Push-up to Down Dog

:30 Seconds

Faster Row
Active Samson

AbMat Sit-ups & Row

Head Up

In the finish position of the sit-up and catch position of the row, it is common to see the shoulders and upper back rounded forward. As athletes sit-up off the ground and travel back towards the catch, reaching their head up towards the ceiling will bring their shoulders down and back into a more neutral position.

AbMat Sit-up Movement Prep

Establish Finish Position
5 AbMat Sit-ups

Row Movement Prep

Establish Catch Position
:30 Seconds Rowing

Russian Kettlebell Swings

Chest Angle

The more aggressive athletes are with extending their hips, the more upright their chest can remain during the swing. Less folding over means a faster cycle time, getting the heavy kettlebell out of the hands sooner. It also helps minimize midline fatigue, making for better sit-ups and rowing.

Arms Parallel

The finish position for the Russian Kettlebell swing is arms parallel to the ground. If athletes are able to get a good hip pop, the bell will feel weightless as it reaches this position. This weightless moment is a great opportunity to relax the hands, as grip will likely become a factor with rowing and heavier swings back to back.

Movement Prep

With lighter weight:
5 Kettlebell Deadlifts
5 Hip Pops
5 Russian Kettlebell Swings

1 Round

7 Russian Kettlebell Swings (Lighter Weight)
7 AbMat Sit-ups
7 Calorie Row

Build to workout weight

1 Round

7 Russian Kettlebell Swings
7 AbMat Sit-ups
7 Calorie Row

With 120 total Russian Kettlebell Swings today, athletes will likely want to break these up from the beginning. A steady pace on the sit-ups and rowing should allow athletes to maintain 2-3 sets per round on the swings. 15-15 or 12-10-8 are possible breakup strategies. With little interference between the swings and the sit-ups, athletes can afford to hold on a little longer and/or minimize their rest between sets.

Saturday 7.14.18

“Turtle Club”

For Time:
21 Overhead Squats (95/65)
200 Meter Run
21 Thrusters (95/65)
200 Meter Run
15 Overhead Squats (95/65)
200 Meter Run
15 Thrusters (95/65)
200 Meter Run
9 Overhead Squats (95/65)
200 Meter Run
9 Thrusters (95/65)
200 Meter Run

Two movements, one barbell. Athletes will pick one barbell weight based on which one is their limiting factor. The barbell should be light, something that athletes could complete 21+ repetitions of each movement unbroken when fresh. If overhead squat is limited by mobility and not loading, it is ok to go significantly down in weight to practice positioning and maintain a regular weight for the thrusters. If unable to run, complete one of the following:

200/150 Meter Row
14/10 Calorie Assault Bike
20/14 Calorie Schwinn Bike

:30 Seconds

Active Spidermans
PVC Pass Throughs

Active Samson
PVC Around the World

Air Squats
PVC Pass Throughs (More Narrow)

Push-up to Down Dog
PVC Overhead Squats

Modified Barbell Warmup

5 Good Mornings
5 Back Squats
5 Elbow Rotations
5 Snatch Grip Push Press
5 Overhead Squats
5 Front Squats

Thrusters & Overhead Squats

Balance

In both of these movements, we are looking the bar to stay positioned over the middle of the foot throughout the range of motion. The overhead squat likely provides more of a positional issue for athletes than the thruster. To really feel out this balance and where the bar should be, we’ll perform some overhead squat therapy with a PVC pipe within two uprights on the rig. Athletes will buddy up and share two posts. With both ends of the PVC pipe pressed against the rig, athletes will try and maintain contact as they descend into the squat. The more the feet are in line with the posts, the more it will resemble a true overhead squat. Athletes will complete three slow repetitions on the coach. 1 minute total before switching! 10 Seconds Down, 5 Second Pause, 5 Seconds Up.

Overhead Squat Movement Prep

PVC Squat Therapy – 3 Repetitions (10 Down, 5 Pause, 5 Up)

:30 Seconds PVC Overhead Squats

5 Pausing Overhead Squats

Thruster Movement Prep

3 Pausing Front Squats
3 Strict Press

3 Push Press
3 Thrusters

1 Round

With empty barbell:
10 Overhead Squats
100 Meter Run
10 Thrusters

Build to workout weight

1 Round

5 Overhead Squats
100 Meter Run
5 Thrusters

It’s all about the barbell today. Athletes can think about the runs as more of a recovery station than a work station, with more focus put into thriving on the 90 barbell repetitions. Looking to complete the barbell movements somewhere between 1-3 sets. On the round of 21’s, this may look like 12-9 or 8-7-6. On the 15’s, this could be 9-6 or 8-7. Finally, on the set of 9’s, athletes are ideally holding on for all 9 without dropping. Taking the runs slower to attack the barbell will pay off, as it keep athletes moving more and resting less.

Friday 7.13.18

“Doce”

AMRAP 4:
27/21 Calorie Row
21 Power Cleans (135/95)
15 Burpee Box Jump Overs (24/20)

rest 4 minutes

AMRAP 4:
27/21 Calorie Row
21 Power Cleans (115/80)
15 Burpee Box Jump Overs (24/20)

rest 4 minutes

AMRAP 4:
27/21 Calorie Row
21 Power Cleans (95/65)
15 Burpee Box Jump Overs (24/20)

Bringing the intensity with an quick interval work today. Looking for all athletes to get to the burpee box jump overs on each round. We can adjust weights or reps as necessary to accomplish that. If athletes finish the burpee box jump overs, they will head back to the rower. The weights on the barbell get lighter each round. These should be weights that athletes could complete at least 15, 20, and 25 reps unbroken respectively. Stagger athletes on opposite four minute windows if short on rowers.

:30 Seconds

Easy Row
Active Spidermans

Medium Row
Push-up to Down Dog

Fast Row
Active Samson

Barbell Warmup

5 Good Mornings
5 Back Squats
5 Elbow Rotations
5 Strict Presses
5 Stiff-Legged Deadlifts
5 Front Squats

Front Rack Stretch – :30 Seconds

Laying on your chest, place our elbows out in front, arms bent at 90 degrees. The goal is to close the gap between the armpits and the floor, which will stretch the lats, shoulders, and triceps.

Pigeon Pose – :30 Seconds Each Leg

From a pushup position, sweep one leg beneath your body. Let’s use the right as an example. With your right leg beneath your body, aim to adjust your shin so that it is perpendicular to your torso – in other words, horizontal in relation to where your torso is facing. Slowly imagine sinking your waist back and down to the floor as you feel the stretch in the outside of your hip.

Chest Stretch – :30 Seconds Each Side

Athletes will lay on their chest with arms out in a “T”. Bring the left arm next to the left shoulder and swing the left leg over the right leg, feeling a stretch in the right pec. Hold for one minute on this side, focusing on breathing, before switching.

Row

Relax the Arms

An early arm bend on the rower is a warning sign that the athlete will also bend their arms early on the power cleans. This arm bend across both movements will cause excess muscle fatigue and put a ceiling on how much work can get done. Relaxing the arms will allow athletes to drive as much as possible with the legs and accumulate calories quicker.

Chest Up

Relating the row to the power cleans again, looking for athletes to maintain an upright chest in the catch position. If they round forward on the rower, they are also likely to do so at the bottom of the power cleans, limiting breathing and putting extra demand on the lower back.

Burpee Box Jump Overs

Pop, not Push

Pushing the body up out of the burpee like in a push-up and then jumping the feet up will excessively fatigue the arms. Popping up out of the bottom instead of pushing-up out of the bottom will allow athletes to move more consistently through this movement.

Different Gears

There can be a few different gears of the burpee box jump overs based on how much time is left in the workout. The slower gear involves a step-up out of the burpees into a jump up and over the box. The faster gear entails a quick jump up and over the box. With a short amount of time left in each AMRAP, the second option will most likely be the best option. However, having both gears in the tank will be beneficial during the workout.

Movement Prep

3 Frog Hops
3 Burpees
10 Small Hops
10 Tall Hops
3 Step-ups (each side)
3 Box Jumps
3 Burpee Box Jump Overs

Power Cleans

Bend

When cycling the barbell, it is common for athletes to reach towards the ground when making contact at the bottom of each repetition. In this position, the hips commonly stay high as the shoulders drop down. This movement pattern results in athletes pulling more with the back, rather than driving off the ground with the legs. At the bottom, athletes can bend the knees to get the bar to track over the loops of the laces with a vertical shin and upright chest.

Movement Prep

3 High Hang Power Cleans
3 Hang Power Cleans

6 Power Cleans

Touch all 3 weights, then put opening weight on the bar for a practice round.

1 Round

5 Calorie Row
5 Power Cleans
5 Burpee Box Jump Overs

Today is less about gaming and more about bringing the intensity. The row should be at an uncomfortable pace, but not an all out sprint. Holding on for 1-3 sets on the barbell. Lighter is harder as it allows athletes to hold onto the bar longer. Athletes can push hard through this four minute interval knowing that there is four minutes of rest to follow. Each AMRAP is scored separately as rounds and reps.

Thursday 7.12.18

“Impressed”

AMRAP 15:
1 Rope Climb
12 Double Dumbbell Push Press (50/35)
1 Rope Climb
100 Meter Wreck Bag Run (50/35)

Today’s workout presents athletes with a variety of odd objects to throw around. The weight on the dumbbells should be something that athletes could complete 21+ repetitions unbroken when fresh. The Wreck Bag weight should allow athletes to run for every 100 meter run today. If unequipped with Wreck Bags, completed a run with another weighted object. If unable to run, complete one of the following:

Heavy 50 Meter Weighted Walk
10/7 Calorie Assault Bike (No Arms)

Line Drills

200 Meter Run
Quad Stretch
Knee to Chest
Solider Kicks
Knuckle Drags
Side Lunge
Cradle Stretch
Walking Samson
Walking Spidermans
Walkouts
3 Air Squats + Broad Jump
High Knees
Butt Kickers
Skip for Height
Skip for Distance

Child’s Pose – :45 Seconds

With arms together and straight out front, have athletes sit back onto their legs while dropping the chest and head towards the ground. Relaxing as much as possible and focusing on breathing will deepen the stretch.

Dumbbell Ankle Stretch – :30 Seconds Each Side

Stepping out into a lunge, place dumbbell on top of front knee. Keeping the heel on the ground, drive knee forward over the toe.

Rope Climb

Toes

No matter what rope climb technique athletes choose to utilize, the foot lock with always remain the most important aspect of the movement. One way to ensure that the feet do not slide and set athletes back in their progress up the rope is to point the toes up when ascending. If the foot is flexed and the toes are up, the rope can remain securely pinned against the body. The time where it is appropriate to point the toes down (and spread the feet apart) is when descending the rope. The more aggressive the point or distance between the feet, the faster athletes will descend.

Clamp – Stand – Reach

It is common on the rope climb to see the right things happen, but in the wrong order. What often happens is athletes clamp their feet, but try to pull themselves up with the arms and stand with the legs at the same time. Rather than using the arms to pull the body weight up, athletes can think about clamping the the feet, standing all the way up with the legs, and finally reaching the arms to full extension overhead.

Movement Prep

3 Foot Locks
2 Foot Lock + Stand + Reach
1 Rope Climb

Movement Substitutions

Seated Rope Pulls (2:1 Ratio)
1/2 Rope Climbs (2:1 Ratio)
Pull-ups (5:1 Ratio)
Ring Rows (5:1 Ratio)

Dumbbell Push Press

Dip

It is common to see a very deep dip in the push press. While a deeper dip may get more legs involved, it could cause the torso to lean forward or the heels to come off the ground. Thinking shallow and powerful today. To initiate the dip, athletes will slightly unlock the knees by driving them out, followed by an aggressive drive upward.

Finish

In the finish position, the elbows will track closely to the ears with the weight balanced right over the middle of the foot and the belly tight. Holding this position will get athletes familiar with the end range of the push press.

Movement Prep

With lighter weight

Establish Dip Position
15 Second Dip Position Hold

5 Dumbbell Strict Press

15 Second Finish Position Hold

5 Dumbbell Push Press

Wreck Bag Run

Lean

When a weight is on our back and we are moving forward, there is the tendency to want to lean forward at the hips. However, a break at the hips puts a great deal of strain in the lower back and compresses breathing. Rather than leaning at the hips, leaning at the ankle keeps the body in line and uses gravity to assist in the run.

Breathe

Even if we are in a perfect position here, breathing will still be more challenging due to the extra weight on our backs. This means that athletes really must focus on getting full breath in and a full breath out. For those who are used to taking shallow breaths in through the chest, this will be a good time to practice deep belly breathing. The weight almost forces athletes into learning to breathe the correct way.

Movement Prep

50 Meter Wreckbag Run

1 Round

1 Rope Climb
3 Dumbbell Push Press (Light Weight)
50 Meter Wreck Bag Run

Build to workout weight

1 Round

1 Rope Climb
3 Dumbbell Push Press
50 Meter Wreck Bag Run

While the rope climbs do present a challenge, they are only completed one at a time. The majority of the workout is spent on the dumbbell push press and Wreck Bag runs. The goal of today is to move at a pace that allows for the dumbbell push press to be completed unbroken. This is likely the only place that athletes would stop moving entirely, so slowing down the other movements to keep moving here will better allow athletes to get more work done. The more comfortable athletes are with the push presses, the faster they can afford to move on the runs and rope climbs.

Wednesday 7.11.18

“Lost Count”

For Time:
200 Double Unders
1,500 Meter Row
100 Wallballs (20/14)
35/25 Calorie Assault Bike

Longer chipper workout today. Athletes will move through each movement in order, choosing a weight on the medicine ball that they are capable of completing 30+ wallballs unbroken when fresh. Stagger by 5-6 minutes if short on machines. If unable to Assault Bike, complete one of the following:

50/35 Calorie Schwinn Bike
50/35 10 Meter Shuttle Runs
35/25 Calorie Row

:30 Seconds

Easy Row
Easy Bike
Push-up to Down Dog

Medium Row
Medium Bike
Active Spidermans

Faster Row
Faster Bike
Air Squats

Ankle Stretch – :30 Seconds Each Side

Step one foot forward into a lunge. Keeping the heel on the ground, lean the bodyweight over the front leg, driving the knee forward over the toe. Actively move back and forth to stretch the calf muscles.

Squat Hold – 1 Minute

Using the medicine ball to drive the athletes to the bottom of the squat, the goal here is to drive the knees out with the elbows while keeping the heels on the ground.

Child’s Pose on Medicine Ball – :30 Seconds

With arms together and straight out front on a med-ball, have athletes sit back onto their legs while dropping the chest and head towards the ground. Relaxing as much as possible and focusing on breathing will deepen the stretch.

Row

Heels

While experienced rowers do not always have the keep their heels down in the catch, athletes who struggle keeping their seat away from their feet will greatly benefit from keeping the heels planted. This allows them to avoid the early lean back and quad dominant stroke that happens when only the toes are pressing the body away in the stroke.

Hands

With a longer row today, it is a great opportunity for athletes to practice getting the hands in front of the knees before they bend. At the finish of the stroke, athletes will punch the hands forward, lean with the torso, and finally bend the knees to establish the catch position. Going a touch slower here helps with position and allows athletes to better recover their breath and legs before the next stroke.

Movement Prep

:30 Seconds Heels Down Row
:30 Seconds Segmented Row (Hands – Torso – Legs)

Double Unders

Heels

When bounding in the double under, we are looking for the heel to ever so slightly kiss the ground. Staying on the ball of the foot without letting the heel gently touch increases the demand on the calf and achilles. Letting the foot relax and heel to touch allows the calf and achilles to store energy and makes the rebound up more effortless. Feel the heel.

Hands

Looking for the hands to stay at about hip width, slightly in front of the pocket. If athletes had sparklers in their hands, they would be making tight circles and not long, loopy ovals. Keeping these circles on the tighter side ensures that the rope stays where they want it, allowing the legs and arms to better sync up.

Movement Prep

:20 Seconds Easy Singles
:20 Seconds Higher Singles
:20 Seconds Double Under Practice

Movement Substitutions

Reduce Reps
5 Minutes Double Under Practice
400 Single Unders

Wallballs

Hands

A couple ways the hands can be useful here. The first is determining distance from the wall. With 100 wallballs, setting up correctly will make a big difference. A great starting place is to go arms extended in front of the body with the hands touching the wall. Depending on arm length, athletes can adjust slightly forward or backwards. Being too close requires an uncomfortably upright torso and being too far away forces athletes to throw the ball more horizontally, likely leading to them getting pulled forward when receiving it on the way back down. Secondly, looking the hands to be placed under the ball as opposed to the outside, allowing athletes to efficiently transfer the power from the legs into the arms.

Heels

If the distance away from the wall is correct, it will be easier for athlete to “feel the heel” in the squat. If athletes are able to get the heels where they want them to be on the previous two movements, they will likely be more successful doing so during the wallball.

Movement Prep

Establish Start Position
5 Front Squats
5 Push Press
5 Wallballs

1 Round

10 Double Unders
50 Meter Row
5 Wallballs
5 Calorie Bike

Looking at this workout at a whole can be overwhelming at first. Taking it one set at a time helps athletes stay focused in the moment, not getting too far ahead of themselves. Success today is not about big sets, rather consistent sets. It doesn’t matter if athletes do 20 sets of 10 on the rope or 20 sets of 5 on the ball, as long as they maintain a steady work/rest rhythm. Tracking rest will be beneficial today to keep athletes on track. Taking a specific number of breaths or counting to 3 or 5 before beginning the next set can be helpful. Pick a breakup strategy, pick a rest length, and try to stick to it.

Tuesday 7.10.18

“Helen”

3 Rounds:
400 Meter Run
21 Kettlebell Swings (53/35)
12 Pull-ups

Repeating the CrossFit benchmark workout “Helen”. Athletes should choose a weight on the kettlebell that they are confident they will go unbroken with on all three rounds and a pull-up variation that they could complete unbroken when fresh. If unable to run today, complete one of the following:

500/400 Meter Row
28/20 Calorie Assaut Bike
40/28 Calorie Schwinn Bike

Line Drills

200 Meter Run
Quad Stretch
Knee to Chest
Solider Kicks
Knuckle Drags
Side Lunge
Cradle Stretch
Walking Samson
Walking Spidermans
Walkouts
3 Air Squats + Broad Jump
High Knees
Butt Kickers
Skip for Height
Skip for Distance

Kettlebell Calf Smash – 1 Minute Each Side

Place on leg on kettlebell, moving ankle through as much range of motion as possible. Start low and work way up the calf. Spend more time in areas of tightness. Placing the opposite leg on top of the bottom leg will add more pressure.

Child’s Pose on Kettlebell – 1 Minute

With arms together and straight out front, have athletes sit back onto their legs while dropping the chest and head towards the ground. Relaxing as much as possible and focusing on breathing will deepen the stretch.

Pull-ups

Hand Position

If you have athletes hang from their fingertips, their knuckles will be in front of the bar. If they have their knuckles over the bar, they will find that more of the hand is in contact and that they have a more secure grip. If they had to hang from a bar for an extended period of time, they would most likely pick the second option to do so. Not only is knuckles over the bar a safer and more secure grip, but it also shortens the lever arm, making the movement easier. If knuckles are in front of the bar, athletes have to pull a further distance from a less stable position, which is not as efficient as knuckles over.

Movement Prep

10 Second Dead Hang
10 Scap Pull-ups
5 Kipping Swings
1-3 Strict Pull-ups or Ring Rows
3 Pull-ups

Movement Substitutions

Reduce Reps
Ring Rows
Banded Pull-ups
Jumping Pull-ups

Run

More Steps

A common misconception in running is that the longer your strides are, the faster you’ll complete your run. However, when athletes foot travels too far out of the back or the front, it results in either a heel strike or a mid-foot strike. In both these scenarios, the foot striking out in front of the center of mass serves as a brake, slowing athletes down and putting a lot of impact on the joints. Rather than reaching with the foot, we want to think about quickly pulling the foot up so that the ankle bone of one foot is in line with the opposite knee. The more steps taken directly under the body, the better running will look and feel.

Movement Prep

10 Bunny Hops (In Place)
10 Meter Bunny Hops
10 Meter Alternating Foot Pulls
100 Meter Run

Kettlebell Swings

Straight Arms

Very often when swinging a kettlebell, there can be a small bend in the arms at the bottom of the swing. Over the course of many repetitions, this adds a lot of extra tension onto the biceps. Knowing there is an immediate transition to the pull-ups, we want athletes to do their best to keep their arms as long as possible when the bell is between their legs. This enables the hips to create the majority of power of the swing overhead and takes stress off the arms.

Grip

Grip also plays a factor in holding onto both the kettlebell and pull-up bar. The weightless moment at the top of swing is a great opportunity to relax the grip. Avoiding death gripping the handle throughout the whole movement will allow athletes to avoid excessive forearm fatigue.

Movement Prep

With Lighter Weight

5 Kettlebell Deadlifts
5 Russian Swings
5 Full Swings

1 Round

200 Meter Run
10 Kettlebell Swings (Lighter Weight)
5 Pull-ups

Build to workout weight

1 Round

100 Meter Run
5 Kettlebell Swings (Workout Weight)
5 Pull-ups

The first goal in Helen is to push for unbroken sets on the work inside the gym. In order to do so, we are looking at pacing the runs to ensure we can accomplish these numbers in big, consistent chunks across all three rounds. Just like on “Nancy”, we would rather slow down the runs a touch if that allows you to hold onto the bell and pull-up bar. If we have the movements on the inside of the gym unbroken without a doubt, it’s the opposite approach – it’s a question of how hard can we push the running. For athletes with previous scores, doing the math for what split they need to hold across the three rounds will help them feel out if they are on track when they leave the building after round one. Building in time to this section to go for a cool down walk or have stretch with athletes after the workout is complete.