Comptrain Class
Programming

Tuesday 5.22.18

“Sugar Daddy”

21-15-9:
Deadlifts (225/155)
400 Meter Run

“Sugar Daddy” is a CFNE benchmark workout. As with most a fair majority of our benchmark workouts, they are comprised of simple couplets. Today we have deadlifts. The deadlifts should be performed at a weight that athletes could compete 21+ repetitions unbroken if needed. If unable to run, complete one of the following:

5090 Meter Row
40/28 Calorie Schwinn Bike
28/20 Calorie Assault Bike

Line Drills

200 Meter Run
Quad Stretch
Knee to Chest
Solider Kicks
Knuckle Drags
Side Lunge
Cradle Stretch
Walking Samson
Walking Spidermans
Walkouts
Toe Walk
Heel Walk
Side Shuffle
High Knees
Butt Kickers

Barbell Warmup

5 Good Mornings
5 Back Squats
5 Elbow Rotations
5 Strict Press
5 Stiff-Legged Deadlifts
5 Front Squats

PVC Game

Have athletes circle up with PVC in hand. The coach will give the call of right or left. Athletes will let go of their PVC pipe and try to grab the persons to their left or right. Widening the circle makes it more difficult and brining it in makes it easier. A couple ways to play here. The group can be one team and any time a PVC hits the floor, there is a penalty of some bodyweight movement. You can also play elimination. In this one, if an athlete drops their PVC, they are out and complete a penalty.

Running

Pistons

The legs can be thought of as pistons when running. The heel should be pulled straight up and straight down so that it lies directly under the hip. It is very common for the leg to swing far back behind the body or over stride in front of the body. Athletes are essentially putting on the brakes when that happens. If they can combine a proper pull with an effective lean like we spoke about last week, running will feel more effortless for them.

Movement Prep

10 Stationary Heel Pulls (Each Leg)
10 Alternating Heel Pulls (20 Total)
10 Leaning Heel Pulls (Moving Forward) + 100 Meter Run

Deadlifts

3-Point Hinge Drill

This drill will be performed with a PVC pipe in order to give athletes some awareness of what neutral feels like during their hinge pattern on the deadlift. Athletes will start by placing the PVC pipes vertically running along the back of the body with three points of contact. The goal is to keep the PVC in contact with the back of the head, between the shoulder blades, and with the lower back throughout the whole hinge pattern. When the back rounds, the neck arches back, or the core becomes disengaged, one part of the PVC will lose contact with the body. Having athletes perform 10 good mornings during this drill will give them valuable feedback to transfer over into the workout.

Movement Prep

3 Point Hinge Drill
5 Barbell Good Mornings
5 Hinges to Knee
5 Deadlifts

Build to lighter weight

1 Round

5 Deadlifts
200 Meter Run
5 Deadlifts

Build to Workout Weight

1 Round

3 Deadlifts
200 Meter Run
3 Deadlifts

 

Similar to “Boat Race” last Friday, both these movements are important in regards to score. We can aim to find a balance between the two so that speed can be maintained. While athletes are capable of going unbroken on the first set, we’re all familiar with the feeling after a big set of deadlifts. If they reach a near failure point on the first set, the legs will feel heavy and slow on the runs. Breaking the 21’s and 15’s into three sets with short breaks should allow some speed to preserved on the runs. The last round doesn’t require much thought. Athletes can turn the brains off and the jets on for the final set of deadlifts and run.

Monday 5.21.18

“Cindy Got Jacked”

For Time:
5 Rounds of “Cindy”
30 Overhead Squats (135/95)
1,000 Meter Row

In this chipper workout, athletes should choose a weight on the bar that they could complete 20+ unbroken overhead squats when fresh. Within the workout, this is ideally completed in no more than 3 sets. One round of “Cindy” consists of 5 Pull-ups, 10 Push-ups, and 15 Air Squats. If short on rowers, stagger heats by 5 minutes to avoid getting backed up on the machines.

:30 Seconds

Easy Row
Active Spidermans

Medium Row
Push-up to Down Dog

Faster Row
Air Squats

Modified Barbell Warmup

5 Good Mornings
5 Back Squats
5 Elbow Rotations
5 Snatch Grip Push Press

5 Overhead Squats
5 Snatch Grip Stiff-Legged Deadlifts

PVC Pass Throughs – :30 Seconds


With hands wide and arms long, raise arms up and over the head until PVC touches behind you.

Warrior Squats – 1 Minute

With the barbell on the ground directly in front of you, squat down and place one hand on. Keeping that elbow locked out and your chest tall, reach with the opposite hand overhead, focusing on rotating the shoulders and upper back (thoracic). Look towards the fingertips, pause for a moment, and then change arms.

PVC Overhead Squats – :30 Seconds

With elbows locked out overhead, squat to full depth with a pause in the bottom. Quality over speed here.

Rowing

Chain

In the world of water rowing, the oar will naturally move up and down as a part of the stroke. The blade has to go into the water and out of the water. However, when training on an erg, moving the handle up and down only leads to a more inefficient position and can put more strain on the shoulders. Mark with either tape or chalk a small line that gives athletes a visual point of reference on where the chain should be while they are rowing to finish out the workout today.

Movement Prep

Mark Line
:30 Seconds Rowing

Pull-ups

Knuckles Over

If you have athletes hang from their fingertips, their knuckles will be in front of the bar. If they have their knuckles over the bar, they will find that more of the hand is in contact and that they have a more secure grip. If they had to hang from a bar for an extended period of time, they would most likely pick the second option to do so. Not only is knuckles over the bar a safer and more secure grip, but it also shortens the lever arm, making the movement easier. If knuckles are in front of the bar, athletes have to pull a further distance from a less stable position, which is not as efficient as knuckles over.

Movement Prep

10 Scap Pull-ups
5 Kipping Swings
1-3 Strict Pull-ups or Ring Rows
3 Pull-ups

Movement Substitutions

Reduce Reps
Ring Rows
Banded Pull-ups
Jumping Pull-ups

Push-ups

Squeeze the Back

In the bench press, athletes squeeze the upper back together to create a stable platform to press from. Flipping things upside down, we can think about the same thing here. Bringing the shoulder blades together puts the shoulder in a better position, making for a secure, and actually smaller range of motion.

Movement Prep

Establish Bottom Position
Establish Top Position
5 Push-ups

Movement Substitutions

Reduce Reps
Push-ups to Box or Bench

Air Squats

Set the Tone

The air squats in “Cindy” set the tone for the overhead squats that follow. The things that can have a great carry over to the barbell will be driving the knees out, keeping the heels on the ground, and the chest upright. Thinking of these air squats as a primer for the overhead squats makes for better reps on a more difficult movement.

Movement Prep

5 Pausing Air Squats (Top and Bottom)
5 Air Squats

Overhead Squats

Flex

Keeping a constant upward pressure on the bar in the overhead squat is important. A prerequisite to working against the gravity pushing down is keeping the elbow completely locked. When the elbow is locked, only then can athletes support the bar to the best of their ability. Flexing the triceps hard is a great way to make sure that athletes are able to maintain this position. Is it nearly impossible for the elbows to bend when the triceps are working hard.

Movement Prep

3 Slow Overhead Squat with Pause
3 Overhead Squats

Build to Workout Weight

3 Overhead Squats

1 Round

1 Round of “Cindy”
5 Overhad Squats
100 Meter Row

 

The pacing of the rounds of “Cindy” will likely be centered around the upper body movements. Breaking the pull-ups and push-ups into at least two sets from the get-go wouldn’t be a bad idea. What’s more important than the air squats themselves are the movements that surround them. Pull-ups, push-ups, and overhead squats. The air squats can be a great opportunity to let the upper body recover so that they can move through better pressing, pulling, and supporting the bar overhead.

Once at the overhead squats, athletes can aim to complete these in three sets maximum. 12-10-8 or 10-10-10 are both viable options.

Finally, we can think about the row in three sections:
1. First 250 Meters
2. Middle 500 Meters
3. Last 250 Meters

The first 250 meters will likely be the slowest as the upper and lower body will be fatigued from the overhead squats. In the middle 500 meters, athletes want to build a little bit of speed, aiming to go faster than their first 250. The final 250 meters should be the fastest pace of the day, nearly an all out effort to end the workout.

Sunday 5.20.18

“Cowboy Up”

Alternating On the Minute x 20
Minute 1: 3 Deadlifts
Minute 2: 10 Sit-Ups + 20 Double Unders

Start at estimated 50% of best deadlift, and build in loading over the course of the rounds.

Athletes will alternate between deadlifts on the first minute and a combination of sit-ups and jump rope on the second minute. Over the course of the ten rounds, athletes will add weight to their barbells. These should be weights that still allow athletes to compete 3 touch and go repetitions throughout. There is no need to add on every round, so if they get to a challenging weight in the later rounds, they are more than welcome to stay put there. On the other minute, we can choose a double under variation that allows athletes to have at least :10-:15 seconds of transition time between movements. Options listed below. The only score today is weights lifted on each round of deadlifts.

On Sunday’s at CrossFit New England, we do not run group classes. However, there is a coach present for the 3 hour window and a workout written up on the board. The coach is there to give athletes assistance whether they choose to do what is prescribed or something of their own. We will still provide structure here if your affiliate does run a group class on Sunday

Line Drills

200 Meter Run
Quad Stretch
Knee to Chest
Solider Kicks
Knuckle Drags
Side Lunge
Cradle Stretch
Walking Samson
Walking Spidermans
Walkouts
Toe Walk
Heel Walk
Side Shuffle
High Knees
Butt Kickers

Barbell Warmup

5 Good Mornings
5 Back Squats
5 Elbow Rotations
5 Strict Press
5 Stiff-Legged Deadlifts
5 Front Squats

Abmat Sit-ups

Butt Down

The abmat is there to allow for full extension of the abs. However, when the butt comes off the floor, athletes can go into overextension of the lower back. Even though this is an unloaded exercise, this movement pattern can carry over into other movements, like the deadlift.

Movement Prep

5 Slow Abmat Sit-ups
5 Sit-ups

Double Unders & Deadlifts

Dollar Bills

This one cue applies well to both double unders and deadlifts. Athletes can pretend like they have dollar bills tucked between their armpits and ribcage. The goal is not to lose the dollar bills during either of these movements. On double unders, the arms have a tendency to get away from the body out to the side. When this happens, the rope shortens and athletes rotate more through the shoulders than the wrists. When athletes allow their upper body to relax on the deadlift, the bar is likely to track forward of the body, causing the back to round. Don’t lose the dollar bills and everything tends to look better.

Double Under Movement Prep

:15 Seconds Single Unders
:15 Seconds High Single Unders
:15 Seconds Double Unders

Double Under Movement Substitutions

Reduce Reps
2x Single Unders

Deadlift Movement Prep

5 Hip Hinges (hip to knee)
5 Deadlifts

Build to around 50% of 1RM

2 Rounds

3 Deadlifts (Opening Weight)
5 Sit-ups
15 Double Unders

 

The only strategy today involves planning out estimated weight jumps for the deadlifts. With not a lot of time between movements, athletes can plan on having the weights organized in a way that allows for easy loading onto the barbell. Mapping out weights on a whiteboard will give athletes a good estimation of where they want to be. It is always great to have a plan, but if weights feel heavier or lighter than expected during the workout, this plan can easily be adjusted on the fly.

Saturday 5.19.18

“Bike Drop”

Teams of 3:
For Time (30 Minute Cap):
90/60 Calorie Schwinn Bike, 75 Power Snatches, 75 Thrusters (75/55)
90/60 Calorie Schwinn Bike, 60 Power Snatches, 60 Thrusters (95/65)
90/60 Calorie Schwinn Bike, 45 Power Snatches, 45 Thrusters (115/80)
90/60 Calorie Schwinn Bike, 30 Power Snatches, 30 Thrusters (135/95)
90/60 Calorie Schwinn Bike, 15 Power Snatches, 15 Thrusters (155/105)

Teams will work through these three movements together, breaking up repetitions as needed. Athletes must complete all repetitions at the bike before moving to the power snatches and so on. The number of reps will drop each round, but the weight will increase. These should be weights that athletes are capable of completing at least 27-21-15-12-9 repetitions unbroken respectively when fresh. Teams can use multiple bars if athletes plan on using different weights. If all athletes are using the same loads, use one barbell and add weight following the thrusters. This workout is for time, but will be capped at 30 minutes. If unable to Schwinn Bike, complete one of the following:

65/45 Calorie Assault Bike
90/60 Calorie Row
Sprint 200 Meters (Each Partner)

:30 Seconds

Easy Bike
Active Spidermans

Medium Bike
Push-up to Down Dog

Faster Bike
Air Squats

Barbell Warmup

5 Good Mornings
5 Back Squats
5 Elbow Rotations
5 Strict Press
5 Stiff-Legged Deadlifts
5 Front Squats

Child’s Pose – 1 Minute

With arms together and straight out front, have athletes sit back onto their legs while dropping the chest and head towards the ground. Relaxing as much as possible and focusing on breathing will deepen the stretch.

Wrist Stretch – :30 Seconds

From hands and knees position, place palms on the ground with fingertips facing towards you. With elbows locked, actively rock back and forth through range of motion to feel the stretch in the wrist. At the halfway point, switch fingertips to face away and repeat.

Barbell Movements

Upper Back

We often talk about the elbows staying up in the thruster, but one reason the elbows may be dropping is because athletes have lost the rigidity in their upper back. In this movement, we can focus on keeping elbows high and the upper back solid by pulling the shoulders down and back. If we take this concept over to the power snatch, it also helps athletes maintain a neutral spine in the pull on the power snatches.

Thruster Movement Prep

5 Pausing Front Squat
5 Push Press
5 Thrusters

Power Snatch Movement Prep

5 Snatch Deadlifts

2 High Hang Power Snatch
2 Hang Power Snatch
2 Power Snatches

Build to all weights

1 Round

12 Calorie Bike
12 Power Snatches
12 Thrusters

Performed with opening weight. 4 reps per athlete.

 

Going along with the mindset of nearly all of our team workouts, the goal here is to go fast until athletes are about to slow down, then switch out. On the bike, that means probably no more than :15 seconds of sprinting at a time. Early on in the barbell movements, it will be easier to hold on for bigger sets. Athletes may be able to string together 12-15 repetitions per turn. However, as those loads start to increase, we can think about cutting the reps down. With the nature of the thruster, teams can try to hold on for bigger sets there as the bar doesn’t have to come back to the ground. The snatches do come back to the ground with each rep, so although the number of transitions will go up with smaller sets, we can aim to make these transitions quick and seamless.

Friday 5.18.18

“Boat Race”

3 Rounds For Time:
500 Meter Row
400 Meter Run

Rest 3 Minutes Between Rounds

A simple, but effective combination of running and rowing intervals today. Athletes will Row 500 Meters and Run 400 Meters, resting 3 minutes between each of the three rounds. Their score is the cumulative time (including rest) it takes them to complete the three rounds. If unable to run, complete one of the following:

3 Rounds: 1,000 Meter Row (Rest 3 Minutes Between Round)
40/28 Calorie Schwinn Bike
28/20 Calorie Assault Bike

:30 Seconds

Easy Jog
Quad Stretch
Knuckle Drags
Straight Leg Kicks

Medium Jog
Walking Samson
Walking Spidermans
Slow Air Squats

Fast Jog
Toe Walk / Heel Walk
High Knees
Butt Kickers

Pigeon Pose – 1 Minute Each Leg

From a pushup position, sweep one leg beneath your body. Let’s use the right as an example. With your right leg beneath your body, aim to adjust your shin so that it is perpendicular to your torso – in other words, horizontal in relation to where your torso is facing. Slowly imagine sinking your waist back and down to the floor as you feel the stretch in the outside of your hip.

Ankle Stretch – :30 Seconds Each Leg

Step one foot forward into a lunge. Keeping the heel on the ground, lean the bodyweight over the front leg, driving the knee forward over the toe. Actively move back and forth to stretch the calf muscles.

Row

Pull the Weight

When rowing, athletes can imagine that there is a weight attached to the chain 500 meters in the distance. With each stroke, the weight gets a little closer to the front of the erg. Imagining an external object being pulled in makes it more likely that athletes will use their whole bodyweight to move the weight as opposed to just one part of their body.

Movement Prep

:20 Second Easy Row
:20 Second Medium Row
:20 Second Fast Row

Continuous For 1:00

Run

Fall More

The proven way to run faster is to fall more. The further athletes fall forward, the faster they will go. The more upright they are, the slower they will go. A more pronounced angle of falling is the “go button”. To avoid actually falling, athletes will have to naturally increase the frequency of their stride. This means taking more steps over the course of their 400 meter runs.

Movement Prep

5 “Falling” 50 Meter Runs

1 Round

250 Meter Row
200 Meter Run

 

Speed on both the row and the run are important today, but since the row comes first, we can start by talking through the pace there. A good starting place for athletes is to row right around their 2k row pace per 500 meters. If they are comfortable running quickly under fatigue, we can even aim to go a few seconds faster than that pace. Whenever we row in a workout, we have to take into account the difference a few seconds makes in the grand scheme of what other movements are included. For example, rowing at a 1:35 pace vs. a 1:40 pace per 500 only results in a 5 second difference, but is quite a bit more difficult in the effort it takes to complete. With the run to follow, we want to make sure we balance out these two movements. If going 5 seconds slower on the row means they can go 10 seconds faster on their run, they will have a better overall time. Both movements are meant to be fast each round, especially with the rest included, but finding this balance will results in the best possible scores for individuals.

Thursday 5.17.18

“Mano y Mano”

Class Divides into 2 Teams:
3 Rounds:
Team 1: Assault Bike (Team Score)
Team 2: 400 Meter Prowler Push

If Teams of 2-4 Each: 1 Bike + Prowler
If Teams of 5-7 Each: 2-3 Bikes + Prowlers
If Teams 8-10 Each: 4 Bikes + Prowlers

Today we will randomly divide the class into two teams. The workout involves two stations: a bike station and a prowler push station. Team 1 will begin on the assault bike and try and accumulate as many calories as possible, switching out as they see fit. The other team is out pushing prowler sleds for 400 meters. The weight on the sled should be a moderate load that allows teams to run, but not light enough where they easily sprint. As with the bike station, the team on the sled may break up the 400 meters as they see fit, even having multiple athletes pushing one sled at the same time. Once the team with the sled returns and is fully inside the gym together, teams will switch stations. Each team will bike and push the sled three times a piece, with the score being total number of cumulative calories across the three rounds. If unable to bike, complete a calorie row instead.

Line Drills

200 Meter Run
Quad Stretch
Knee to Chest
Solider Kicks
Knuckle Drags
Side Lunge
Cradle Stretch
Walking Samson
Walking Spidermans
Walkouts
Toe Walk
Heel Walk
Side Shuffle
High Knees
Butt Kickers

Assault Bike

Fast Start

With multiples athletes working through the bike, there will be some built in rest. When a new athlete hops on the bike for their turn, a sprint start will blast the wattage through the roof and help teams accumulate more calories. More power in, more calories out.

Transitions

The goal on the bike can be to keep the wheel spinning as fast as possible for as long as possible. The less time an athlete isn’t on the bike, the longer the wheel will be moving. Teams can practice which direction they plan on getting on and off the rower to minimize transition times. This combined with a fast start means time well spent at this station.

Movement Prep

:15 Second Sprint Per Athlete

Prowler

Forward Lean

The more aggressive the lean, the faster the speed. You see this with sprinters vs. marathon runners. Sprinters have a much for aggressive fall angle. The more horizontal athletes are, the faster the sled will move today.

Fast Feet

In running, longer strides and more time in contact with the ground does not always equal faster splits or higher intensity. Sometimes, a faster cadence and less time with the feet on the ground gets the job done better. Same idea with the prowler. The faster the feet move and the more steps athletes get in, the quicker they get to their rest period.

Movement Prep

100 Meter Team Empty Prowler Push
Load Prowler With Weight
100 Meter Team Prowler Push 

1 Round

Team 1: Assault Bike
Team 2: 50 Meter Sled Push

Switch when sled gets back

 

Both the bike and sled station reward speed and effort. The faster teams move on the sled, the less time the other team will have to accumulate calories. Knowing the other team is trying to get the sled done as fast as possible, every second and every transition matters on the bike. Athletes can switch out right before they feel they are about to slow down in order to keep the bikes and sleds moving as fast as possible for as long as possible. The team who rides the bike first does have a little bit of an advantage because they are not yet fatigued from the sled. Flip a coin or play rock-paper-scissors to figure out which team will bike first.

Wednesday 5.16.18

“Snake Bite”

Option A

For Time:
21-15-9
Squat Snatch (95/65)
Chest to Bar Pull-ups

Option B

For Time:
15-12-9
Power Snatch (95/65)
Overhead Squats (95/65)
Pull-ups

Option C

For Time:
15-12-9
Power Snatch (75/55)
Overhead Squats (75/55)
Pull-ups

In this classic CFNE Benchmark workout, looking to choose a weight on the barbell that athletes could complete 15+ snatches and chest to bar pull-ups unbroken when completely fresh. Stimulus here is to complete the work in under 12 minutes. For athletes who have no goals of competing in the sport of CrossFit, we have provided two more options that replace the squat snatch and chest to bar pull-ups.

:30 Seconds

Active Spidermans
Knuckle Drags

Push-up to Down Dog
Side Lunges

Active Samson
Air Squats

PVC Pass Throughs
PVC Overhead Squats

Modified Barbell Warmup

5 Good Mornings
5 Back Squats
5 Elbow Rotations
5 Snatch Grip Push Press

5 Overhead Squats
5 Snatch Grip Stiff-Legged Deadlifts

Squat Hold – 1 Minute

Using a post for support, assume the bottom of the squat. The goal here is to get the butt as close to the heels as possible and drives the knees out while keeping the heels on the ground. Fight for position over the course of 1 minute.

Child’s Pose – 1 Minute

With arms together and straight out front, have athletes sit back onto their legs while dropping the chest and head towards the ground. Relaxing as much as possible and focusing on breathing will deepen the stretch.

Warrior Squats – 1 Minute

With the barbell on the ground directly in front of you, squat down and place one hand on. Keeping that elbow locked out and your chest tall, reach with the opposite hand overhead, focusing on rotating the shoulders and upper back (thoracic). Look towards the fingertips, pause for a moment, and then change arms.

Chest to Bar Pull-ups / Pull-ups

Grip

We can relate the grip on the pull-up to that of the snatch. If athletes were to snatch with a very narrow grip, it would make for a very long distance to lockout and demands more out of the arms. Widening the grip out makes the turnover much quicker and gets the lats and upper back more involved than the biceps. This also goes for the chest to bar pull-up. Widening the grip a little further outside of shoulder width makes for an easier range of motion, and takes some of the workload off the upper arm. This can be said for the standard pull-up as well, but is more prominent on the chest to bar due to it’s increased range of motion.

Hips

Just like with any core to extremity movement, the bigger muscles pass off to the smaller muscles. In this case, the hips should do most of the work, with the upper body simply finishing the movement by guiding the chest to the bar or the chin over the bar. If athletes are muscling their pull-ups with their arms, their is a good chance they’re going to do the same thing on the barbell. Hips, then arms.

Movement Prep

10 Scap Pull-ups
10 Kip Swings
1-3 Strict Pull-ups
3 Pull-ups
3 Chest to Bar Pull-ups

Movement Substitutions

Reduce Reps
Pull-ups
Banded Pull-ups
Jumping Pull-ups
Ring Rows

Snatches

Meet the Bar

We often talk about getting a lot of power out of the hips, but since we power snatch more than we squat snatch, it may be more difficult for athletes to meet the bar as they pull themselves under into the squat. This problem can also occur in the power snatch, but is more common in the squat variation. At a lighter weight, if they try and jump the bar to where they are used to in the power movement, it can lead to balance issues when receiving the bar. This is because the bar is still traveling upwards as they are settling in the opposite direction. We still want to use the hips as the main power source, but in a controlled manner. We wouldn’t snatch a 95# barbell like we would a 185#, just like we wouldn’t jump on a 20” box like we would a 30”. Only doing as much work as is required leads to better balance here.

Patience

There is often a rush to stand up out of the bottom of a snatch or an overhead squat. While a sense of urgency is usually good for scores, here it can lead to stability issues. It is common to see athletes stand up when the weight is in the toes or when they are trying to control the bar. It is much more difficult to find a balance when moving than it is when static. It is better to take the extra half second in the bottom than it is to rush the way up.

Movement Prep

5 Power Snatch Balances

2 High Hang Power Snatches
2 Hang Power Snatches
2 Power Snatches

5 Squat Snatch Balances or 5 Overhead Squats (Pause in Bottom)

2 High Hang Squat Snatches or High Hang Power Snatches
2 Hang Squat Snatches or Hang Power Snatches
2 Squat Snatches or Power Snatches

Build to lighter weight

1 Round

3-2-1
Squat Snatch (Lighter Weight)
Chest to Bar Pull-ups

or

3-2-1
Power Snatch (Lighter Weight)
Overhead Squat (Lighter Weight)
Pull-ups

Build to workout weight

1 Round

3-2-1
Squat Snatch
Chest to Bar Pull-ups

or

3-2-1
Power Snatch
Overhead Squat
Pull-ups

While many athletes are capable of completing the round of 21 unbroken or close to unbroken, doing so can lead to a major drop off in rounds 2 and 3. Intelligently breaking up the first round similar to how they would the round of 15 will lead to consistency across all sets. Some possible rep schemes for the round of 21 are 7-7-7 / 9-7-5 / 6-5-4-3-2-1. This approach should allow individuals to better get through the round of 15 to come. Athletes can break the rounds of 15 and 9 into 2-3 sets based on how they are feeling. For athletes who are overhead squatting, the goal will be to complete those repetitions close to unbroken. It is ok if they need to break the power snatches a little more to accomplish that goal.

Tuesday 5.15.18

“Anchored Down”

5 Rounds, On the 4:00:
30 Air Squats
20/14 Calorie Row
10 Lateral Rower Burpees

Every four minutes, athletes will complete one round of “Anchored Down” and rest until the next interval begins. Rounds begin on the 0:00, 4:00, 8:00, 12:00, and 16:00. The score today is the slowest of the five rounds. If short on rowers, stagger the second group two minutes behind. These rounds will begin on the 2:00, 6:00, 10:00, 14:00, and 18:00. The goal here is to find a fast pace that athletes can see themselves maintaining over the five rounds.

:30 Seconds

Easy Row
Push-up to Down Dog

Medium Row
Active Spidermans

Faster Row
Active Samson

Pigeon Pose – 1 Minute Each Leg

From a pushup position, sweep one leg beneath your body. Let’s use the right as an example. With your right leg beneath your body, aim to adjust your shin so that it is perpendicular to your torso – in other words, horizontal in relation to where your torso is facing. Slowly imagine sinking your waist back and down to the floor as you feel the stretch in the outside of your hip.

Couch Stretch – 1 Minute Each Leg 

Facing away from a wall in a kneeling position with hands on the floor for support, place one leg so that the shin bone is as close to the wall as possible (the respective foot will be in the air). Slowly bring the opposite foot up in front of you, and keep the heel down for a base of stability. Slowly bring your chest up as you imagine driving your waist forward, and hold at a position that provides a deep, but not overwhelming stretch. Focus on your breathing.

Air Squats

Hips Back, Knees Out

The air squats are by far the easiest movement of the workout, but how we perform these can make the row easier or harder. Especially when trying to go fast, it is common to see athletes lead with the knees on the way down. In this scenario, athletes are more quad dominant and unless they have very good ankle mobility, their heels will likely come off the ground. We will use squat therapy to help athletes do the common uncommonly well.

Movement Prep

Banded Squat Therapy – 10 Repetitions on Coach

Squat Therapy is a great evaluator of common errors in the squat and can help to dial in mechanics, while banded squats help prime the lower body for effective squatting. Today we are combining these two drills into one. If your gym is equipped with mini bands, have athletes place the band just below the knee. You may also double or triple loop a low tension band. Athletes will face a wall or a barbell placed in a rack, leaving enough room for them to squat to full depth. At first, we are looking to squat to full depth, with the hip crease passing below the top of the knee. Using plates or a medicine ball can be a good landmark for athletes. The torso may not be upright, almost in an immature squat position, but this is ok if other points of performance are met at the beginning. Athletes will place both hands overhead and want to avoid touching the wall during their squat. Hands extended overhead forces them to keep the core braced and recruits the muscles of the back. This braced and upright position is beneficial in all squat, but especially the overhead squat. Distance from the wall can be adjusted based on the athlete. During the squat, athletes will work to:

1. Spread the floor apart with the feet
2. Maintain lumbar curve
3. Send the hips down and back
4. Have the knees track over the toes
5. Keep the heels grounded
6. Hips below crease of knee

Row

Straps

Transitioning from air squats to the rower, making sure the straps are set to the appropriate tightness will allow for powerful strokes and reduced transition time. They should be loose enough where athletes don’t have to worry about using their hands to adjust, but tight enough so that the feet do not lose too much contact with the foot plate during the drive.

How Far Forward?

When athletes pick up their handle to begin their stroke, the handle travels from directly above it’s place holder. However, on subsequent strokes the added momentum can cause the handle to pass forward of this location. This is natural, but what isn’t normal is for the handle to travel well past its starting place. When this happens, it is likely that athletes are overreaching and rounding the upper back. Let’s use the starting point for the handle today as a reference during the stroke. Length is good, but only good length.

Movement Prep

Set Straps
5 Transitions In and Out of Straps
:30 Seconds of Rowing

Lateral Rower Burpees

Hit the Deck

With only 10 repetitions of burpees to finish the round out, we want to spend as little time as possible in the air. Whether athletes are just getting out of the rower for their first rep or it is their second to last rep, hitting the deck as fast as possible will increase cycle time. If athletes are getting on the ground fast, that means they are also staying low to the floor, as there is no need to stand up between reps.

Movement Prep

3 Push-ups
3 Frog Hops
3 Lateral Rower Burpees

1 Round

10 Air Squats
8 Calorie Row
6 Lateral Rower Burpees

The rower is the central point of focus on today’s workout. This movement is equal parts skill and effort. We worked on the skill in movement prep, but within the workout today we want to combine that knowledge with a great effort. Whether rounds stay the same or fall off all comes down to how long the calories take each round and the transitions in and out of the rower. With the monitor there to help us, athletes can have a goal Calories Per Hour in mind and do whatever it takes to hold that each and every round. If those numbers stays the same, their times likely stay the same as well.

Monday 5.14.18

“Double Crossed”

For Time:
10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1:
Clean and Jerks (115/80)
30 Double Unders After Each Set

Athletes should choose a weight on the bar today that they are capable of completing 15+ unbroken clean and jerks when fresh. Within the workout, this should also be a weight that allows them to cycle the barbell for multiple repetitions each set. Following the clean and jerks, athletes will complete complete double unders or a double under variation. This equals a total of 300 repetitions if done prescribed. If this is a large cumulative number for athletes, we can think about brining the number down after each set, or competing 60 single unders.

:30 Seconds

Lateral Hops
Push-up to Down Dog

Front to Back Hops
Active Spidermans

Single Unders
Active Samson

Barbell Warmup

5 Good Mornings
5 Back Squats
5 Elbow Rotations
5 Strict Press
5 Stiff-Legged Deadlifts
5 Front Squats

Wrist Stretch – :30 Seconds

From hands and knees position, place palms on the ground with fingertips facing towards you. With elbows locked, actively rock back and forth through range of motion to feel the stretch in the wrist.

Ankle Stretch – 30 Seconds Each Leg

Step one foot forward into a lunge. Keeping the heel on the ground, lean the bodyweight over the front leg, driving the knee forward over the toe. Actively move back and forth to stretch the calf muscles.

Front Rack Stretch – 1 Minute

Laying on your chest, place our elbows out in front, arms bent at 90 degrees. The goal is to close the gap between the armpits and the floor, which will stretch the lats, shoulders, and triceps.

Double Unders

Overextension

One of the things often seen with double unders is an overextension of the back. When the body isn’t in an ideal position to start, it is going to be more difficult to have control of the rope and the body, making an already challenging movement even harder. Brining the shoulders over the hips and the hips over the ankles is the first step. This stacked position makes for more efficient jumping and gives athletes better leverage to spin the rope. Imagine how much harder it would be to whisk eggs or drive a car while leaning back. Brining the shoulders back in line with the hips will also likely bring the hands into their resting position, just in front outside and in front the hips with the palms facing out.

Movement Prep

10 Seconds Overextended Jumps (No Rope)
10 Seconds Stacked Jumps (No Rope)
15 Seconds Fast Single Unders
15 Seconds Higher Single Unders
15 Seconds Double Taps
15 Seconds Double Under Practice

Movement Substitutions

Reduce Reps
60 Single Unders
30 Seconds of Double Under Attempts

Clean and Jerks

Jump & Drop With Weight Back

With a lot of jump rope in the workout today, that means athletes will be moving from a front foot dominated movement (double unders) to a full foot dominated movement. This makes it more likely that they will jump and land from the toes when cleaning or jerking the bar overhead. When this happens, the bar will feel heavier and out of position. It is important today that whenever jumping or landing, that the whole foot is on the ground to help generate power from all the legs and maintain balance. Three simple words: whole foot down.

Movement Prep

Establish Clean Receiving Position
2 High Hang Power Cleans
2 Hang Power Cleans
2 Power Cleans

2 Strict Press
2 Push Press
Establish Jerk Receiving Position

4 Push Jerks

3 Clean and Jerks

Build to lighter weight

1 Round

3 Clean and Jerks
5 Double Unders
2 Clean and Jerks
5 Double Unders
1 Clean and Jerk
5 Double Unders

Build to workout weight

1 Round

3 Clean and Jerks
5 Double Unders
2 Clean and Jerks
5 Double Unders
1 Clean and Jerk
5 Double Unders

“Double Crossed” is a heavily front loaded workout on the clean and jerk side, with nearly half the repetitions being completed just in the sets of 10, 9, and 8. With that being said, the clean and jerks will be the more important movement early on, with the double unders serving as more of a speed bump. Athletes have the option to string together 2-3 sets on the barbell, or to go with very fast single repetitions. Knowing the clean and jerks are more important than the rope early on, pushing these a little more might be the better option. As the workout progresses and the reps on the clean and jerks go down, the double unders become more significant. Single repetitions on the barbell later on may allow athletes to transition to the rope quicker and have more success completing the 30 repetitions with minimal problems. Athletes should make sure that their ropes are placed neatly on the group following the clean and jerks to allow for an easy transition when they need it to be.

Sunday 5.13.18

“Pump It Up”

3 Rounds:
5 Strict Handstand Pushups
5 Strict Pull-Ups
10 Dumbbell Strict Presses
10 Dumbbell Bent Over Rows (each arm)

100 Calorie Schwinn Bike

3 Rounds:
5 Strict Handstand Pushups
5 Strict Pull-Ups
10 Dumbbell Strict Presses
10 Dumbbell Bent Over Rows (each arm)

The priority in “Pump It Up” is more on quality of movement than on speed. If the quality is there, athletes can then add speed. Athlete’s choice on loading today. The dumbbells should be unbroken, but challenging. Ok to have different weights for the two different movements. If unable to bike today, complete a 1000 Meter Run or Row.

On Sunday’s at CrossFit New England, we do not run group classes. However, there is a coach present for the 3 hour window and a workout written up on the board. The coach is there to give athletes assistance whether they choose to do what is prescribed or something of their own. We will still provide structure here if your affiliate does run a group class on Sunday.

1 Minute

Easy Bike
Active Spidermans

:45 Seconds

Medium Bike
Active Samson

:30 Seconds

Faster Bike
Push-up to Down Dog

Dumbbell Warmup

Completed with light dumbbells

5 Stiff-Legged Deadlifts
5 Front Squats
5 Strict Presses
5 Reverse Lunges (each leg)
5 Strict Presses
5 Front Squats
5 Stiff-Legged Deadlifts

Overhead Stretch on Wall – 1 Minute

Have athletes place hands at shoulder width on the wall with arms full extended. Pressing the hands into the wall so they do not slide, drop the head and the chest towards the ground as much as possible. Walking the feet back and relaxing as much as possible will let gravity do the work in opening up the shoulders.

Pigeon Pose – 1 Minute Each Leg

From a pushup position, sweep one leg beneath your body. Let’s use the right as an example. With your right leg beneath your body, aim to adjust your shin so that it is perpendicular to your torso – in other words, horizontal in relation to where your torso is facing. Slowly imagine sinking your waist back and down to the floor as you feel the stretch in the outside of your hip.

Front Rack Stretch – 1 Minute

Laying on your chest, place our elbows out in front, arms bent at 90 degrees. The goal is to close the gap between the armpits and the floor, which will stretch the lats, shoulders, and triceps.

Couch Stretch – 1 Minute Each Leg 

Facing away from a wall in a kneeling position with hands on the floor for support, place one leg so that the shin bone is as close to the wall as possible (the respective foot will be in the air). Slowly bring the opposite foot up in front of you, and keep the heel down for a base of stability. Slowly bring your chest up as you imagine driving your waist forward, and hold at a position that provides a deep, but not overwhelming stretch. Focus on your breathing.

Strict Handstand Push-ups

Inverted Strict Press

Approaching our strict handstand push-ups like an upside down strict press makes it simple to understand how we are supposed to move. In the start position of the strict press, the hands are slightly in front of the head and the feet directly under the body. As we initiate the press, the head moves slightly forward to center the bar on the body. When we flip up onto the wall, not much changes. First priority is solid hand and foot position. From there we want to focus on the head coming through as athletes near lockout, and the head returning towards the wall on the descent.

Movement Prep

5 Push-ups
3 Pike Push-ups
1 Wall Walk
3 Kick Ups
5 Strict Handstand Push-ups

Movement Substitutions

Push-ups

Strict Pull-ups

Hollow Body

Looking to maintain a hollow body as much as possible today. Keeping the toes slightly in front of the bar keeps the body in a better position for pulling. While the “seahorse” pull-up arches the back and gets the chin to the bar easier, it does not help develop strength in a good position.

Movement Prep

10 Scap Pull-ups
10 Hollow Rocks
1-3 Strict Pull-ups

Movement Substitutions

Reduce Reps
Ring Rows
Banded Strict Pull-ups

Bent Over Rows

Back and Head Neutral

Looking to find our classic hinge position on bent over rows, keeping the back and head in a similar position to the start of a deadlift. This ideal body position is a safe and powerful position.

Torso Static

Choosing a weight that is challenging, but one that athletes can maintain a static torso is important. Some of the benefits to the back and the shoulder are lost when we start getting the hips involved. Looking to stay as isolated as possible.

Dumbbell Strict Press

Elbows by Ears

Often when athletes press the dumbbells overhead, the arms are in a “Y” position more so than an “I” position. Keeping the elbows by the ears makes sure the joints are stacked over each other.

Movement Prep

5 Dumbbell Strict Press

1 Round

2 Strict Handstand Push-ups
2 Strict Pull-ups
2 Dumbbell Strict Press
2 Dumbbell Bent Over Rows
10 Calorie Bike

Again, time is the less important factor in today’s workout. Quality movement on the strict movements for the 6 rounds takes priority. The better the technique, the easier those movements tend to be. Taking the extra rest to go unbroken on all four movements is ideal. Athletes can push the bike to their liking in the middle. Great chance to work on strength and get a sweat on.